HnR Bred Fielder wins 9th time at Woodbine in 48th Career Start

Eight year old PABRED gelding Fielder won for the 9th time in career start 48 at Woodbine Race 2 August 14 2022, in a Starter Optional Claiming Race going 6 furlongs on the All Weather Tapeta track. Fielder, a stakes winner and PA Sprinter of the year in 2018, brought his career record of 48 starts to 9 wins, 7 places, and 11 shows for an excellent in the money percentage of 56% along with $465,000 in career earnings.

Bred by HnR Nothhaft Horseracing LLC (HnR), Fielder a PABRED, by Sidney’s Candy out of Karakorum Fugitive by Ten Most Wanted, was born at Northview PA on March 28th 2014 and sold privately as a yearling. Fielder blossomed as a sprinter with a career best Equibase Number of 110 earned this year while posting 2 wins in 5 starts to go along with a place. Fielder’s 48 starts are the most for any horse bred by HnR.

Fielder MSW PARX Dec 16, 2017

Danon Early 3yo Colt by Frankel o/o Finest City seeks 2nd win Sunday

Danon Early, first foal o/o 2016 Eclipse Award Winner and Breeders’ Cup Champion Finest City by world leading sire Frankel, seeks his 2nd career victory in Race 7 at Chukyo Race Track Sunday afternoon June 5th. Finest City, a PABred, was bred by Hank Nothhaft via HnR Nothhaft Horseracing LLC is by City Zip o/o Be Envied by Lemond Drop Kid.

Finest City Northview MD with Hank

Danon Early has compiled a career record of 8 starts 1 Win 2 Show and 1 Place with $96,000 in career earnings. Danon Early made his first 7 starts on turf before switching to the dirt in a 1600 meter (~mile) effort and coming from the clouds to earn his first win.

Danon Early 3yo colt by Frankel o/o Fines City

Chukyo Race 7 is slated for 1800 meters (~1 1/8 mile) dirt, offering the winner a $60,000 purse. The field consists of a 12 horse field, including older horses, with Danon Early the 4th favorite on the Morning Line in his first start against winners. Norihiro Yokoyama retains the ride for Trainer Takayuki Yasuda. This will be Danon Early’s 3rd start with blinkers

HnR’s Shoscombe Prince Equestrian Career Progresses

Four Year old Bluegrass Cat Colt Fast Learner Smooth Jumper

Shoscombe Prince Leaps in Eventing Care

Shoscombe Prince by Blue Grass Cat o/o Fly Down Too by Mineshaft continues progress in his 2nd career as an equestrian eventer. Bred to race, HnR with great optimism, named him Shoscombe Prince after one of our beloved Sherlock Holmes Mysteries by Arthur Conan Doyle.

After graduating from his initial training at Eagle Point Farm, The Prince arrived at the track to become a race horse. Though all class, sound and very intelligent, his trainer determined that The Prince did not possess the requisite speed for a successful racing career.

Being a realistic regarding our horses prospects, and believing the value of the horse over his entire life is critical, The Prince was retired completely sound and un-raced . In order to give The Prince a strong lift into a productive 2nd career, he was placed with Carleigh Fedorka’s Sewickley Stables for equestrian training. Given his demeanor, talent and physical make-up he quickly found a home with an adult equestrian in Kentucky.


Lady Lynne moves to 2nd Career

4 yo Jump Start Filly Concludes 13 race Career 2 wins 2 place 2 show completely sound, moving to post race career

HnR Horseracing decided to retire Lady Lynne, PABRED, Homebred rather than compete at lower claiming ranks where she remained competitive. Retiring sound, in our view, gives Lady Lynne the best chance to find the perfect forever home.

Lady Lynne moves to 2nd Career

Lady Lynne Winning at Delaware Park

Lady Lynne winning her final career race at Delaware Park Sept 2021

Beyond the Races has undertaken the task of finding Lady Lynne her post racing home. Check out this overview on Beyond the Races FACEBOOK PAGE. https://www.facebook.com/AfterTheRaces/posts/372160141619729

Made in America wins 37th Running of the Forego Stakes

In his sixth start, Made in America became a Stakes Winner, and as first foal of his dame, became Kindle’s first Stakes winner as well. Besides surviving the San Luis Rey fire (AKA Lilac Fire) that killed 46 horses, Made in America has overcome two soft tissue injuries that kept him off the track 7 months and 9 months respectively. As a result, Made in America (KY) made his 6th start at the beginning of his five year old campaign.

MIA Post Parade Forego Stakes
Made in America on his toes in the post parade

Timing of his comebacks has resulted in five of his starts taking place at Turfway Park. Three starts were on the old Polytrack, and he has now booked two races on the new Tapeta track, racking up a 5 starts 3 wins 2 places record. The places coming after the long aforementioned lay-offs. Four of his starts have been 6.5 furlong affairs and one allowance win at a mile. HnR believes that Made in America (KY) is a miler and is winning the sprints on shear talent.

Given the condition book at Turfway Park and the fact that Made in America (KY) is fit and sound our goal is to run there two more times before the end of the meet, preferably at a mile or greater. Ideally, Made in America (KY) would run in his next Allowance condition and then in the Kentucky Cup Classic at 1 1/8 miles to wrap up the campaign.

After being checked and bumped, Made in America was not to be denied in a late rally

If we are fortunate to achieve these goals, Made in America (KY) trains well on the dirt, so we will be looking at all dirt and all weather opportunities as we work through the year. Made in America (KY) ships well and the Mid-Atlantic/Kentucky/Indiana circuits are our targets, His Dame Kindle (KY) won on the turf, dirt and all weather. We know that the great Tiznow was an astonishing performer on the dirt.

Made in America (KY) heads to the post parade with Declan Cannon up

Below is the Thoroughbred Daily News summary of the Forego Stakes.

FOREGO S., $63,410, Turfway, 1-15, 4yo/up, 6 1/2f (AWT), 1:16.70, ft.

1–MADE IN AMERICA, 120, g, 5, Tiznow–Kindle (MSW & MGSP, $243,370), by Indian Charlie. 1ST BLACK TYPE WIN.

O/B-HnR Nothhaft Horseracing LLC (KY);

T-Ben Colebrook;

J-Declan Cannon. $38,285. Lifetime Record: 6-3-2-0, $112,010. 2–

Made in America (KY) connections award presentation
Made in America Connections and owner/breeder Hank Nothhaft accept trophy from Mike Matagllia

Hurricane Highway, 120, g, 5, Quality Road–Stormy Kiss

(Arg), by Bernstein. ($10,000 Wlg ’16 KEENOV; $80,000 Ylg ’17 OBSOCT; $15,000 2yo ’18 FTKFEB; $95,000 2yo ’18 OBSAPR).

O-Contreras Stable, Inc. and Trostrud Jr., Earl J.; B-Marchanta Syndicate (KY); T-Cipriano Contreras. $12,350.

3–Lookin to Strike, 120, g, 6, Lookin At Lucky–Miss Bonnie, by Officer. ($22,000 Wlg ’15 KEENOV; $32,000 RNA Ylg ’16

OBSAUG; $210,000 2yo ’17 OBSAPR). O-Gary Barber; B-Fedai Kahraman (KY); T-Mark E. Casse. $6,175.

Margins: HD, 3/4, NK. Odds: 7.90, 8.10, 4.50.

Also Ran: Dabo, Eagle Song (Ire), Frosted Ice, What’s Up Dude, Guildsman (Fr), Bango, Unmoored. Scratched: Awesome Gent, Escapade, Fast Fire.

Made In America scored a narrow upset to earn his black-type badge at Turfway Friday night. Keeping tabs from third early, the gelding rallied down the center of the track in the lane to get the win by a head.

Graduating at third asking at Turfway in February, Made in America captured an optional claimer there a month later. Subsequently shelved, he resurfaced Dec. 31 at this oval, finishing second in an allowance.

Made in America is the first foal out of MSW & MGSP Kindle, whose recent produce includes the now-3-year-old colt Palazzi (Pioneer of the Nile) and a yearling colt by Into Mischief. She was bred back to American Pharoah.”

Nothhaft finds thrills in the Thoroughbred Industry

 

INTERVIEW Bloodhorse Daily “MarketWatch” 

Sept 28, 2018

By Meredith Daugherty

twitter  @BH_MDaugherty

Ten years ago, Hank Nothhaft founded HnR Nothhaft

Horse Racing and dove into the world of

Thoroughbred breeding, racing, and sales. Blood-

Horse MarketWatch spoke with Nothhaft about what

sales mean for his operation, how the state of the market

affects breeders, and what the industry can do to

help ensure continued success at all levels.

MarketWatch: How did you get your start in the

industry?

Hank Nothhaft: After graduating from the (U.S.)

Naval Academy and serving in the Marine Corps, I

became a startup technology executive. I ended up

as the CEO of five venture-backed, high-tech-based

startups in the telecommunications business. It’s a

high growth environment; I call it adrenaline-driven.

Looking over the horizon and going from being

the young bull to the old bull, I realized that even if

I wanted to go on forever, I had to be realistic. So I

systematically decided to start a business that would be

a viable alternative to being a CEO that I could run in

retirement and have a lot of fun with. To have the same

sort of thrills I experienced in the business world. So

in 2007-08, I stuck my toe in the water of the industry

and have proceeded from there via the school of hard

knocks, trying not to make the same mistake twice.

We’ve had a lot of tumult in a short period of time

because of the significant financial recession that

occurred in 2008. I got started just before that, and

I had made some calculations that turned out to be

not very accurate, but because I was a financial expert

when the collapse occurred, I took advantage of that

situation to do what I call a “restart round” and push

aside the things I had done incorrectly to try and have

a more successful path. I certainly had the satisfaction

of enough good things happening that my adrenaline

addiction has been satisfied.

MW: Were you familiar with the industry at all

when you made your transition?

HN: I had no direct connection with the horse

racing industry whatsoever when I started, but I get up

most mornings very thankful that I made that fateful

decision to get involved. My wife and I were very casual

fans, so that was certainly part of it. The other part was, I

went to Europe frequently and I was addicted to reading

Dick Francis novels, and I would carve a day out here or

there to go to tracks within easy rail distance from London.

I had a romanticized view of the British horse racing

industry, but as silly as that sounds, it 

did play a part in my decision.

 

Hip 91, 2018 Keeneland September Yearling Sale

The American Pharoah colt consigned as Hip 91 at the

Keeneland September Yearling Sale

 

MW: Ten years after forming HnR NothhaftRacing, how did you feel

about watching the American Pharoah—Kindle colt that you sold

as a weanling for $400,000 sell for $2.2 million as Hip 91 at this year’s

Keeneland September Yearling Sale.

HN: It was a great time. I derive a lot of satisfaction from those

moments, and it doesn’t have to be a big monetary achievement. I think

the sale was fantastic. I think it was like a Hollywood script that we had

the first yearlings from a Triple Crown winner, and we

had Sheikh Mohammed there for the first time in 10

years. We also had the Coolmore/Godolphin détente in

place and a phenomenal stock market going, a new tax

bill, new players in the industry, a global marketplace …

what could be better than that? The results of the sale

are unequivocally outstanding.

MW: What was special about that colt that you

remember from your time with him?

HN: I paid $50,000 for his dam, Kindle. I had a

tremendous relationship with the horse, spent a lot of

time with her when she was racing, and she was our

first stakes winner. She has the greatest disposition.

The reason I was able to buy her was that she was a

bit short. I moved her to Kentucky because regional

sires are not really commercial, but I breed all my

Pennsylvania mares in Kentucky, and they’re all foaled

out in Pennsylvania.

With Kindle, and a handful of really commercial

mares, I’ve been producing Kentucky-breds, but

mostly I have Pennsylvania-breds. No one knew with

her what kind of foal she’d produce, but she’s a robust

mare. With American Pharoah, I was lucky to have a

couple mares that were good enough to be accepted, so

I bred Kindle to him. From the get-go, she produced

an exceptional foal. Almost perfect. He’s the proudest looking,

most balanced horse, and I love the streak of

lightning blaze on his face. He was the prime candidate

to sell as a weanling. My reserve was $400,000, and it was exactly on

the nose.

I’m so excited for the horse, because I’ve heard rumors that they’ll

ship him to the United Kingdom.  Assuming that’s the case, the top

folks in the Sheikh’s operation will get a good look at him and then

put him in a position somewhere in the world to be as successful as

possible. My great hope would be that he works out as a dirt horse and

that maybe he could be the Sheikh’s Kentucky Derby (G1) horse.

The one thing I realized by selling horses is that they

end up in better hands than mine. People with better

contacts, more money, and better resources than my

own. There couldn’t be anyone that meets that criteria

better than Sheikh Mohammed. When you sell them,

you set in motion a chain of events that could never

have occurred had you retained ownership yourself.

I bred Kindle to Pioneer of the Nile, and I have this

phenomenal Pioneer of the Nile colt. He’ll be in Book

1 of the Keeneland November Breeding Stock Sale.

I also had Hip 1 in the (September) sale. She was an

RNA, so I have entered her in the Fasig-Tipton October

Yearling Sale (as Hip 624). I want to try to capitalize

on the current market demand for quality American

Pharoah bloodstock. I am confident that given a better

position, she will be a standout in this sale. If not, we

are certainly prepared to keep and race her, as she is a lovely filly.

“When you sell them you set in motion a chain of

events that could never have occurred had you

retained ownership yourself.”

—HANK NOTHHAFT

 

MW: From a breeder’s perspective, what did you

think about the Keeneland September sale and the

quality of the yearlings being offered?

HN: In terms of the sale’s success being a mark

of our industry turning the corner from the market

downturn, the thing that I really look at as a breeder

is, how many horses are being bred? The last numbers

that were available are not super encouraging. We kind

of flattened out more or less three or four years ago,

and we haven’t really turned the corner. Kentucky has

gotten back to where they were 20 years ago, but if

you look at what percentage of horses that represents,

they’ve gone from being 35% of the horses bred in the

industry to somewhere around 55%. That means, likely,

if you look at each state, all the other states have had

significant declines.

I look at those bigger states that have had a tradition

in the horse racing business, and some of them are

at a third of where they were, some have all but

disappeared. So coming out of the sale, I think the thing

is that the industry will have really turned when the

horse population responds or we reduce the amount of

racing that is taking place, because there aren’t enough

horses to feed the engine we currently have.

I think you have to look at the sales and look at the

later books and see how many horses are being sold at

a loss. You have to ask yourself, “Why and how could

this sustain itself if there are people who are breeding

and losing money?” And they can’t continue to do that

indefinitely. I think one of the bright spots can be state

incentive programs like in Pennsylvania, where I’m

involved. You can breed a reasonably competitive horse

there, keep it, race it, and make money and have fun,

or take it to a sale and maybe it sells at a loss, but if

the owners race it, then you can actually break even or

make a profit.

What’s kept me happy and in the game is that I’m

treating this like a startup. I’ve been bootstrapping and

reinvesting what I have back into the business to grow

it, and one of the big things that has helped me do that

is the state incentive program. Relative to my needs,

it’s generated a lot of cash that’s helped keep me in

the game. I can tell you without breeders, there is no

industry. Period.

If the industry wants to maintain the broad racing

schedule they have, they’re going to have to inevitably

produce more horses. Eventually, it has to be profitable,

or at least help people break even, for breeders and

enthusiasts to get into the game. I do know a lot of

people took mares out of service in smaller states, so we

need those to come back in.

MW: Do you think the market can continue the

trajectory it has taken this year?

HN: There are hard-core, central players in the

Thoroughbred industry, and those non-newcomers

are not that affected by the stock market and non discretionary

income. They are to a certain extent, but I

think the U.S. economy is in a sweet spot, and the only

thing that could upset the apple cart in my mind would

be the federal reserve  increasing interest rates too

fast and somehow cutting off this really perfect scenario

we’re seeing in the economy.

My view right now is that we’re solid in the U.S.

I think other countries will adopt more pro-growth

strategies (for) their economies, and that will provide

even more underpinning to the industry. The other

side of the coin, however, is that with breeders, some

other countries have the same problem I proposed that

we have. I think they’re thinking, for example in the

U.K., of putting together a type of incentive program.

Hopefully, breeding numbers start reflecting that

programs are working here in the states.

The top end and the middle market are much higher

than they were. People have got to bid higher for horses

than they would have had to previously. I think what is

true is that people had to bid more money because you

have more money chasing the same number of horses.

The thrill of owning a horse and being involved in the

industry is fantastic. If people were more exposed to it,

many people would want to do it. BH

 

Charles Town Oaks Grand Prix (PA) Breeders Cup

Racing Biz article by Frank Vespe regarding HnR’s Grand Prix plans for Charles Town Oaks.  Frank does an excellent and accurate job of describing Grand Prix’s current status and plans.  

Racing Biz Charles Town Oaks Grand Prix’s Breeders Cup

by Frank Vespe

“Sometimes it’s the breaks you don’t get that turn out to matter most.

Take the case of Grand Prix. Her breeder, Hank Nothhaft, took her to the Keeneland September Yearling Sale in 2015, expecting to leave with more money but one less horse than he brought.

He set her reserve at $150,000. Bidding topped out at $145,000. No sale.

The sophomore is slated to make her next start in the Grade 3, $300,000 Charles Town Oaks September 23. The seven-furlong fixture tops the track’s “Race for the Ribbon” card.

“If you get into racing and you have a little moxie and a little luck, these horses can take you anywhere,” Nothhaft said. “It’s amazing.”

Grand Prix Inside Rail Photo Equi Photo @PARX

Grand Prix began her career in the California-based barn of Gary Mandella. It took her four tries to break her maiden, finally scoring on the synthetic at Golden Gate. She followed that up with a game second – beaten just a nose – in the $50,000 Golden Gate Debutante Stakes.

But for the most part, her West Coast exertions didn’t yield much benefit – just the single win in her first nine starts.

Though Nothhaft, a retired tech entrepreneur, lives in Northern California, he’s a Pennsylvania-bred, as is Grand Prix. So he decided to send the filly back East; though Mandella remains the trainer of record, Grand Prix now operates out of Keith Nations’ Parx Racing barn.

“To be a breeder and an owner to run in Pennsylvania, it’s so much better than the negligible program we have in California,” Nothhaft said.

Grand Prix &Jose Ferrer head to the Winners Circle post Garofalo Stakes

And Grand Prix has taken advantage of that rich program. She won the state-restricted New Start Stakes at Penn National on the Penn Mile undercard, followed up with a win and a second in allowance company, and last out scored by a length-and-a-half in the $100,000 Dr. Teresa Garofalo Memorial Stakes at Parx Racing, also a state-restricted event.

She has three wins and a second from four starts since coming east.

“All in all, she’s very consistent, fires each time, and seems to be improving,” her owner and breeder said.

In the Garofalo, Grand Prix took on older rivals, besting a field that included salty runners like the multiple stakes winners Power of Snunner and Discreet Senorita.

Still, Nothhaft acknowledges that the water figures to be deeper in the Oaks. The race has drawn 52 nominations. Among the expected runners is Shimmering Aspen, the Rodney Jenkins-trained filly who has dominated at sprint distances at Laurel Park this season.

“I think there’ll be some really nice fillies there,” Nothhaft admitted. “I think it’ll end up being a very interesting race. We would be very happy if she finished in the top three.”

To that end, Nothhaft and his trainers have developed what he called “a detailed plan” to help her acclimate to the surroundings at Charles Town, a place neither she nor Nothhaft has ever raced. She’ll ship in a few days ahead of the race and get a chance to gallop over the track a time or two prior to race day.

“If you’re going to go through all of the trouble of going, you want to make sure you do everything you can to give her a chance,” Nothhaft explained.

Nothhaft also intends to stick with jockey Jose Ferrer, who rode Grand Prix to victory in the Garofalo Memorial.

“First, he gave her a great ride that day,” Nothhaft said by way of explanation. “Second, he’s won (almost 4,200) races.”

For the longer term, Nothhaft hopes to race her through her five-year-old season. After that he intends to breed her. He has, he said, “no intention” of selling her despite her rising value.

Nothhaft has been involved in racing since 2008. He’s bred some good horses. He’s owned some good horses. He’s also slogged through all the ways that the sport can fool or foil you. He knows what sort of opportunity is there for Grand Prix.

“You really need these successes to get you over those valleys of despair,” he said. “For Grand Prix, this is our Breeders’ Cup.” ”

 

HnR’s Mister Nofty (PA) Runs to Front for 5th Career Win

In his fourth start of 2017, Mister Nofty, a PA_BRED,  returned to his 2016 form, winning an open 1 mile 70 yard Allowance Race at Penn National going wire to wire unchallenged.   Given a field of seven that included no other early speed, Mister Nofty ran free to the lead under the guidance of his regular rider Brian Pedroza and maintained it during the duration of the race.

Trainer Keith Nation, looking for a turf race for Mister Nofty, entered this race with not turf options in sight.  Mister Nofty continued his front running style and was able to overcome a reasonably talented field in this open allowance non winners other than 2.  This is Mister Nofty’s first strong outing since sustaining minor leg and hoof injuries during the Presque Isle Mile last September.

Mister Nofty worked bullet at Delaware Park Sept 5 for this race. Photo Hank Nothhaft

Mister Nofty came out of this race 100% and will be looking to build on this race.  HnR is looking at all options, dirt or turf.

Mister Nofty is an HnR homebred colt, foaled at Northview Stallions, by Scat Daddy out of Walking Path by Bernardini.  Hank Nothhaft worked with bloodstock agent Carl McEntee of Darby Dan Farm,  to develop the breeding plan that produced Mister Nofty.  He trained at Webb Carroll before starting his racing career. 

Race Statistics

Penn National, Race 7, AOC 9/9, $30,400, 3yo/up, 8.32f (dirt), 1:41.73, track fast. 1–Mister Nofty, 119, dk b/br c, 4, Scat Daddy–Walking Path, by Bernardini, $21,888, O–HnR Nothhaft Horse Racing, LLC, B–HnR Nothhaft Horseracing LLC (PA), T–Keith Nations, J–Brian Pedroza Margin: ¾, 7 starters

Finest City Honored as PA BRED Horse of the Year 2016

The Pennsylvania Horse Breeders Association (PHBA) hosted Its’ 38th Annual Iroquois Awards Banquet on June 9 at The Hershey Hotel. PHBA members, the board of directors, and top Pennsylvania breeders and owners were present for a great night of dinner, cocktails, and conversation.

Brian Sanfratello, Executive Director of the PHBA, served as Master of Ceremonies for the gala evening. Roger Legg PHBA President offered his greetings and welcome to the assembled group, while the Honorable Russell Redding, Secretary of Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture provided insightful comments on the current status and support by PA for the thoroughbred industry.

 

Russell Redding PA Secretary of Agriculture PHBA Awards 2017
Russell Redding PA Secretary of Agriculture PHBA Awards 2017

Henry “Hank” Nothhaft provided the Keynote address describing his journey to breeding Finest City, one of four, and the first PABRED Breeders’ Cup Champion in 24 years, and Eclipse Award Winner as Best Female Sprinter.

Click on the link below for the full script of Hank Nothhaft Keynote.

Hank Nothhaft Keynote Script

PHBA Keynote Audience
PHBA Keynote Audience


Impressive Crystal Trophies were awarded for a number of categories.

Click on the link below to view photos PHBA Crystal Awards.

Photos PHBA Crystal Category & Iroquois Awards 2017

See the full list of Category Winners listed Below.

 

Iroqouis Champions 2017

Full Gallery of Photos of the PHBA Awards, Click Link Below:

PHBA IROQUOIS AWARDS PHOTO GALLERY 2017 

Hank Nothhaft owner of HnR Nothhaft Horseracing accepts Horse of the Year Award for HnR PABRED Finest City.

 

Hank Nothhaft Accepts Finest City HOY Award form Betsy Barr PHBA Director
Hank Nothhaft Accepts Finest City HOY Award form Betsy Barr PHBA Director